Tagged: alchemy

Gwyn ap Nudd – guide of souls into the afterlife

I have been where the warriors of Britain were slain,

From the east to the north:

I am the escort of the grave.

I have been where the warriors of Britain were slain,

From the east to the south:

I am the escort of the dead! *

While the faery midwife Brigit the Bright One‘s time is Imbolc in February, when the snowdrops and crocuses are just beginning to be born into the light, the season of Gwyn ap Nudd is the dark of winter, which he wins rulership over by a duel with the Lord of Summer in October at Samhain.

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John Dee and the Philosopher’s Stone – and Brexit

I can’t help noticing some amazing synchronicities with modern political times as I write about the Elizabethan alchemist John Dee and his purported discovery of the recipe for the Philosopher’s Stone in Glastonbury, for my new book, “Stories in the Land.”

John Dee spent more than three years, during the late 16th century, being feted by the minor princes of Europe just as the continent was beginning to bubble up into the Thirty Years War. It was a patchwork quilt then of tiny principalities that were just starting to wriggle out from under the iron grip of the Holy Roman Empire after Martin Luther had nailed his notice to the church door in Wittenberg which called out the corruption of the indulgence-taking popes and priests.

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Quicksilver Messenger Service – the hidden messages in medieval and Renaissance art

Once we understand the codes in the great masterpieces preserved in the churches, abbeys and cathedrals, then it becomes clear that these symbols are a series of still-life tableaus forming a narrative about the alchemical process of the transformation of metals, with ourselves as the crude lead.

Each metal is assigned a god or goddess to encapsulate their qualities, and we can see these characteristics writ large in the classical Greek dramas featuring the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus.

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The occult meaning of Blake’s poem about Jerusalem

In the book I’m currently writing, Stories in the Land, I am describing the Mystery Rites in which I analyse William Blake’s poem “And did those feet in ancient times …” through an alchemical lens, and I reach a conclusion about its meaning which may surprise you.

Here is the relevant extract.

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The trashing of the symbols of love

The painting below is of St Andrew being crucified on an X-shaped cross. The Scots will recognise the X-shape as the St Andrew’s Cross as it appears on their blue-and-white flag. But to those who understand the hidden language of alchemical love and sex magic, it is known as the saltire cross. This is why the esoteric wing of the Freemasons who call themselves the Scottish Rite and who, at one time, were largely based in Scotland, decided it would be a magically potent symbol for their flag which would help their kingdom to thrive.

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