Category: Mythologies

Brigid the Bright One, the Sleeping Beauty and the Hollow Hills

In the old faery lore of Wessex, Brigid is the beautiful woman sleeping and dreaming under the green mantle of the Hollow Hills where she is protected by a briar rose thorn thicket, and she will only awaken when the Three Utterances — man, animal and faery — come together in Harmony and Love to create the Fourth Utterance.

I love the use of the word ‘utterance’ – bringing to mind the Word of the gospel of St John or Aum, the primordial vibration of the Vedas and the God Particle as it’s known to physicists – in other words, the sound resonating at the heart of every atom born from the Vesica Piscis. When you understand this concept, you realise that to insist upon a division between material nature and spirituality is to create a false dichotomy. That our ancient forefathers knew this is clear from the fact they put so much into effort into creating such extraordinary sacred sites. To me, the three utterances are the three worlds of the shaman.

We first hear about Brigid in the faerytale of the Sleeping Beauty, albeit that the Walt Disney version harks back to the ancient Greeks by naming her Aurora, after their goddess of the dawn. She is helped by the three good fairies who are found in the Old Norse oral tradition in which we meet the three Norns of the spinning wheel of destiny. When the young princess pricks her finger on the spinning wheel, it is a metaphor for menstruation or coming of age in a rite of passage story which is rare in that the hero is a heroine.

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The feeding of the 5,000 at the Sermon on the Mount – decoded

This is an extract from a chapter in my next book, in which I decode the gospels to find allegories for important astrological and alchemical processes.

We know the story of Jesus feeding the multitudes at his sermons on the mound with just a handful of fishes and loaves.

But did you know that that it is a parable that hides an important astrological-alchemical principle in its inner meaning, which goes back to the ancient myths of the mages of Alexandria?

Here’s how someone with the eyes to see what is hidden in plain sight would read the story of the loaves and fishes:

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Zionism and the Whore of Babylon – deconstructed

In my last blog article, I described how the “Zionists” had stolen the clothes of the Jews. But I don’t want us to get stuck on that term when it comes to recognising this globalist enemy to the health, wealth and Sovereignty of nations. If we take a more zoomed-out view of history, we can see that they are masters of disguise and subterfuge in which they infiltrate the highest echelons of power in countries, in order to plunder the wealth of the indigenous peoples who they then turn into human shields and battering rams to fight in their war games, sometimes with each other. Their favourite weapons with which to weaken and enslave whole nations are drugs, pornography and debt – in other words, addiction.

These globalists have only been calling themselves Zionists since the late 19th century. They realised then that, although they owe no allegiance to any race or nation, it would be useful to have their own chunk of land from which to launch their expansionist operations into the Middle East, rather like having your own huge, stationary aircraft carrier on the shores of the Mediterranean.

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Quicksilver Messenger Service – the hidden messages in medieval and Renaissance art

Once we understand the codes in the great masterpieces preserved in the churches, abbeys and cathedrals, then it becomes clear that these symbols are a series of still-life tableaus forming a narrative about the alchemical process of the transformation of metals, with ourselves as the crude lead.

Each metal is assigned a god or goddess to encapsulate their qualities, and we can see these characteristics writ large in the classical Greek dramas featuring the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus.

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Where do we go when all the stories fail?

Where do we go when all the stories fail?

All the stories are failing. Fewer and fewer want to go and sit in big, draughty buildings with high ceilings – no matter how beautifully fan-vaulted – to hear them anymore. The picture below shows the purpose-made wooden pews of the 12th century church of St John the Baptist in Glastonbury, Somerset. Last week, they went to auction to be sold off to the highest bidder.

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A Faery Christmas from the Vale of Avalon

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To the Druids, long before Christianity, Christmas was about the Birth of the Faery Babe, or Radiant Child. This is the story that I see being played out what other people call the Glastonbury Zodiac on the Somerset Levels, a 10-mile wide circular landscape temple where the “stars have fallen to the Earth” to create 13 giant earthworks – as the map shows below:

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A Winter Solstice Tale

Tonight, we enter the Winter Solstice in the sign of Capricorn. To me, this is such a beautiful time when there are unique energies at play from the “Christmas spirits” that can heal the emotional despair and suffering accrued during the previous thirteen moons, and send rejuvenation, fresh hope and inspiration for the coming turn of the calendrical Wheel.

In Earth alchemy and Arthurian legend, the longest night of midwinter, caused by the Sun reaching its furthest point away from the Earth and then returning three days later, on Christmas Day, is symbolised by the death of the Old Wounded Fisher King and the birth of the new King, otherwise known as the Radiant Child. This bursting forth into joyful and victorious rebirth was symbolised by alchemists as the Peacock’s Tail, for which, I think, the aurora borealis is the perfect sky metaphor.

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