Tagged: Archaeology

Weather shamans at sea, 700,000 years ago

There has always been an approved narrative within academia regarding the origins of the human race, and papers about any finds by archaeologists which weaken that narrative usually get savaged while going through peer review and thus never get published.

In fact, the palaeontological record is so sparse that academics extrapolate a lot from a very little in order to make up stories and canards that are designed to satisfy our curiosity which, at the same time, have the effect of stopping us searching any further, believing it’s a done deal.

A recent article in various approved science magazines (like this one) have been reporting, for the first time, this week, that there is evidence of human activity 700,000 years ago in the Philippines. They haven’t found human bones as such. They’re assuming that butchered rhino bones show evidence of ancient hominins, which is what they call more archaic humans, such as Homo Erectus, and not modern humans like us who, the academic narrative has decided, did not appear until about 40,000 years ago. Continue reading

How our prehistoric ancestors celebrated the winter solstice

As we celebrate the Winter Solstice,  we might wonder how these special times were marked by our prehistoric ancestors.  Was it a way of symbolically bringing the dead back to life or a means of making their transition to the afterlife smoother? Here, Mike Williams, the author of Prehistoric Belief, explains what’s known about these midwinter practises in the Neolithic.

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