Why knowing how to spell Pinocchio is vital to understanding the Mystery teachings

Our prime minister’s father, Stanley Johnson, caused some media outrage when he said in a television interview that most of the British public wouldn’t know how to spell Pinocchio. I don’t think, however, it was so much arrogant, out-of-touch elitism, as was claimed, because I also didn’t know how to spell Pinocchio until it came to writing Stories in the Stars in which I devote a whole chapter to breaking down the deeper Mystery Teachings underlying the superficial story of the Adventures of Pinocchio in its original Tuscan form.

It’s probably that tricky single ‘n’ and double ‘c’ combination that’s at fault. It doesn’t register in the old grey matter, because I don’t think it occurs in Anglo Saxon words. In that form of Latin, Pinocchio meant “pine nut”, which is code in certain Mystery Teachings for “pineal gland” or what we call the Third Eye, and therein lies the tale.Coming from Tuscany – aka the land of the ancient Etruscans – for The Adventures of Pinocchio read The Trials of the Hero, the purpose of which are to help him grow alchemically from a wooden puppet to a real boy, which is the soul journey of all mythological heroes going back thousands of years.

For me, this is still a work in progress, but here’s my illustration from Stories in the Stars which shows how the original Etruscan tale was almost certainly based on the classic zodiac journey of the mythological hero through the 12 constellations and three water and fire initiations, to reach enlightenment. It is a nine-month journey, comparable to gestation in the womb and in Celtic myths, the whole process leads to the birth of the Radiant Child. That might also be why Disney left out the adventures of the wooden puppet at Leo, Virgo and Libra, as shown here.


If you live in the UK, you can get Stories in the Stars here, or you will find on your own country’s Amazon.